Wczytywanie
actus humanus GDAŃSK // 13-17.04.2022
ARTISTS
WILLIAM CHRISTIE
WILLIAM
CHRISTIE
WILLIAM
CHRISTIE
Conductor and harpsichordist, William Christie, is the founder of the group Les Arts Florissants and the most important promoter and interpreter of French Baroque music, as well as an eminent performer of the repertoire ranging from 16th- to 18th-century music. He was born in the United States; then, following his studies at Harvard and Yale he left America in 1971 to settle in Paris, where he entered the local Conservatory. As the leader of the group Les Arts Florissants, established in 1979, he has had a profound and personal impact on the reintroduction and exploration of the repertoire which, by then, had been forgotten or had sunk into obscurity, that is, first of all, of virtually all French Baroque music. Thus, he has become an emblematic figure of the resurgence of interest in such genres as tragedie lyrique and opéra-ballet, or the French motet. He has also proposed numerous outstanding creations and recordings of Italian and English works from the same period, from Gesualdo and Monteverdi’s madrigals to operas by Purcell and Handel.
 LES ARTS FLORISSANTS
LES ARTS FLORISSANTS
LES ARTS FLORISSANTS
The ensemble, whose name is derived from the title of a short opera by Marc-Antoine Charpentier, was founded in 1979 by the American-born French harpsichordist and conductor William Christie, with the intention to perform Baroque music on period instruments. The group pioneered in rekindling an interest in French Baroque repertoire. For almost forty years, it has participated in reintroducing countless musical treasures from the collections of the National Library of France, especially from the 17th-century French repertoire, or 17th-, and 18th-century European music – to audiences. Starting with the production of Lully’s ‘Atys’ for the Opéra-Comique in Paris in 1987, the group has achieved its greatest triumphs in the field of opera. The ensemble has recorded nearly one hundred records for labels such as Harmonia Mundi, Warner Classics/Erato, and Virgin Classics. Their catalogue of DVD opera recordings is equally impressive.
VINCENT DUMESTRE
VINCENT
DUMESTRE
VINCENT
DUMESTRE
French instrumentalist, conductor, and expert in the interpretation of early music. Dumestre studied history of art at the École du Louvre, and classical guitar at the École normale de musique de Paris and is considered one of the most inventive and versatile promoters of the revival of baroque music. In 1998, he established the highly appreciated historically informed performance ensemble Le Poème Harmonique. Their repertoire, which reflects the diversity of vocal and instrumental music, consists both of well-known works and reconstructed or re-discovered pieces. Dumestre has performed with such groups as Ensemble Aedes, Accentus Austria, Les Cris de Paris, musicAeterna, Musica Florea, Arte dei Suonatori, Orchestre Régional de Normandie, Capella Cracoviensis or {oh!} Orkiestra Historyczna. He has been active not only as a conductor and musical director of various orchestras and choirs but also as a curator of artistic seasons, music competitions, and festivals. For five years he was the artistic director of the Festival de Musique Baroque du Jura, and also presided over the 2017 Misteria Paschalia Festival. Vincent Dumestre is Chevalier of the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres and of the Ordre national du Mérite.
 LE POÈME HARMONIQUE
LE POÈME HARMONIQUE
LE POÈME HARMONIQUE
This early music ensemble was established at the suggestion of Vincent Dumestre in 1998. It consists of devoted specialists of the historically informed performance of 17th- and 18th-century music. Their concerts, enthusiastically received both in their native country, France, and worldwide, reflect their innovative approach to the interpretation of the musical repertoire and a thorough exploration of its vocal and instrumental texture. The group performs not only well-known, but also slightly less popular works of French, Italian, and English composers. They have appeared in the most prestigious concert halls of France, Italy, England, China, Japan, Austria, Belgium, or Holland, and aroused the admiration of audiences at such events as the BBC Proms, Ambronay Festival, Festival de Beaune, and Festival de Sablé. Their recordings are published by the Alpha Classics label and prominent among their numerous prizes and awards are the ‘Diapason d’Or’, the ‘Choc’ award of ‘Le Monde de la musique’ magazine, and the ‘Preis der deutschen Schallplattenkritik’ (‘German Record Critics' Award’). The ensemble’s activities are not limited to the performance of early music: they are also involved in music education and the dissemination of music. In 2014, Le Poème Harmonique created the École Harmonique, which is a cultural and educational enterprise which teaches music to children.
PETER PHILLIPS
PETER
PHILLIPS
PETER
PHILLIPS
World-famous conductor, performer and explorer of early music, particularly interested in Renaissance music that he studied at Oxford. It was there, too, that he founded The Tallis Scholars ensemble in 1973, a group performing sacred music a cappella. He has been their leader ever since and has given more than two thousand concerts. Phillips is a renowned promoter of the Renaissance polyphony, which he has been propagating through concerts, recordings, and articles as well as by running master classes and choral workshops all over the world. He is also the artistic director of choral singing courses The Tallis Scholars Summer Course. In 1980, he established the record label Gimell and, since 1995, has been the owner and editor of “The Musical Times” magazine. Apart from his output with The Tallis Scholars, Phillips has also collaborated with the BBC Singers, Collegium Vocale Gent, and Netherlands Chamber Choir.
 THE TALLIS SCHOLARS
THE TALLIS SCHOLARS
THE TALLIS SCHOLARS
British vocal early music ensemble founded by Peter Phillips in 1973. Over the years, the singers have won renown fore their historically informed performance and, by winning the ‘Gramophone Award’ in 1987 they confirmed their stature as a leading ensemble performing the vocal sacred music of the Renaissance period. The group is valued, first and foremost, for their clear and clean sound, which allows the listener to appreciate subtlety of the Renaissance polyphony. The group gives concerts all over the world, performing at both popular and sacred venues such as the Sistine Chapel or Basilica of Saint Mary Major. The Tallis Scholars’ ample discography comprises scores of recordings. The latest among them is an album entitled ‘Josquin Masses: Gaudeamus; L’ami Baudichon’ (2018); the seventh of the intended nine recordings in their project of issuing all the masses by Josquin by 2021 which is the quincentenary of the composer’s death.
PAUL VAN NEVEL
PAUL
VAN NEVEL
PAUL
VAN NEVEL
Conductor, musicologist and art historian from a family with a rich musical tradition, Van Nevel is one of the pioneering explorers of early music and an authority in historical performance practices. He studied at the Maastricht Academy of Music and Schola Cantorum Basiliensis. In 1971, he founded the Huelgas Ensemble, with whom he has been performing and recording mediaeval, and Renaissance, music. In his research work, he focuses on performing music in its proper historical context based on analysing manuscripts and any other sources available. This train of activity has helped unearthing many works from this long-forgotten repertoire. His output has contributed to the rediscovery of the Flemish composers Johannes Ciconia and Nicolas Gombert. Van Nevel is the author of their monographs and propagator of their artistic output, which he publishes in transcriptions through the German Bärenreiter publishing house. He is known to share his knowledge with participants of his guest lectures at, among others, the Conservatorium van Amsterdam, Hochschule für Musik, Theater und Medien Hannover, or Centre de Musique Ancienne de Genève. He was also a guest conductor of the Netherlands Chamber Choir for thirty years.
 HUELGAS ENSEMBLE
HUELGAS ENSEMBLE
HUELGAS ENSEMBLE
With fifty years of performance practice, Huelgas Ensemble is one of the most highly esteemed early music groups and a pioneering ensemble in the field of historically informed performance. Attached to the Schola Cantorum Basiliensis, it was founded in 1971 on the initiative of Paul Van Nevel and its name is a reference to the Codex Las Huelgas, a music manuscript, which originated in a Cistercian convent near Burgos, Spain. The group’s core repertoire is the mediaeval and Renaissance polyphony and they particularly focus on forgotten masterpieces by composers of the past. Paul Van Nevel’s ensemble has performed at the most prestigious music centres such as the BBC Proms in London, Lincoln Center in New York, Cité de la Musique in Paris, the Berliner Philharmonie, or Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation and the Belém Cultural Center in Lisbon. The group also regularly takes part in the most important early music festivals. It can boast an impressive discography comprising more than a hundred albums issued by, among others, Sony Classical, Harmonia Mundi France, Deutsche Harmonia Mundi, or ECM.
 AKADEMIE FÜR ALTE MUSIK BERLIN
AKADEMIE FÜR ALTE MUSIK BERLIN
AKADEMIE FÜR ALTE MUSIK BERLIN
Founded in 1982 and also called Akamus, the ensemble is now at the forefront of international orchestras playing period instruments. The band is regularly received in the great musical centres of Europe and is very well-known by the audiences of the most important early music festivals in Poland, too, where it has already achieved several spectacular triumphs. For more than twenty years it has collaborated on a regular basis with René Jacobs, which has resulted in numerous oratories and opera productions, enthusiastically received by both critics and audiences. Akamus often performs under the leadership of Marcus Creed, Daniel Reuss, and Hans-Christoph Rademann, and in recent seasons among their conductors there were such personages as Emmanuelle Haïm, Bernarda Labadie, Paula Agnew, and Rinaldo Alessandrini. The list of Akamus’ collaborators also includes renowned soloists, such as Cecilia Bartoli, Andreas Scholl, Sandrine Piau, Isabelle Faust, Andreas Staier, Alexander Melnikov, and Anna Prohaska. The group’s recordings, which have already won all the most prestigious awards, have so far been sold in over one million copies, a testimony to the orchestra’s international success.
AGNIESZKA BUDZIŃSKA-BENNETT
AGNIESZKA
BUDZIŃSKA-BENNETT
AGNIESZKA
BUDZIŃSKA-BENNETT
The vocalist, harpist, musicologist, founder and manager of the Basil-based Ensemble Peregrina. She received two nominations for “Polityka” passports. Agnieszka Budzińska-Bennett graduated from the Faculty of Musicology (Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznan, Ph.D. in 2010) and undertook vocal studies at Schola Cantorum Basiliensis. The international Ensemble Peregrina, which she founded, specialises in early medieval polyphony. Agnieszka made twelve records with her ensemble that have won significant recognition with international critics (e.g. ‘Mare Balticum’ series). She also collaborates with other early music ensembles (Ensemble Perlaro, Dragma, Ferrara Ensemble, La Cetra, Accademia dell'Arcadia), presenting the Medieval repertoire as well as the music of the 17th and 18th centuries and major festivals in Europe, Asia and the United States.
AGNIESZKA GORAJSKA
AGNIESZKA
GORAJSKA
AGNIESZKA
GORAJSKA
Eminent Polish flutist who initially perfected her modern flute skills with such virtuosos of that instrument as Jean-Pierre Rampal, Philippe Bernold, and János Bálint. As a transverse flute player, she was first taught by Magdalena Pilch, and then continued her education at the Koninklijk Conservatorium, polishing up her skills under the guidance of Wilbert Hazelzet and Catherine Clark. She also took part in master courses where she further perfected her artistry under the supervision of Barthold Kuijken and Patrick Bruckels. As a soloist and chamber musician she performs in Poland and abroad and has already given concerts in Holland, Germany, Czech Republic, and Austria. She collaborates regularly with numerous orchestras specialising in historically informed performance of Baroque music and is a member of the Aetas Baroca early music ensemble with which she gives concerts throughout Poland. In addition, she play with the only Polish Renaissance transverse flutes consort, namely La Viva Fiamma.
MAŁGORZATA FIEBIG
MAŁGORZATA
FIEBIG
MAŁGORZATA
FIEBIG
Organist and carillonist, she graduated from the Academy of Music in Gdańsk, where she had studied at the Faulty of Instrumental Music and Faculty of Choral Conducting. She also received her master’s degree in the class of Frans Haagen at the Nederlandse Beiaardschool at Amersfoort. Fiebig is the winner of numerous prizes in carillon competitions in Holland, Belgium, and Germany. She has given concerts in many European countries, as well as in Curaçao and the United States. In 1999 she assumed the post of municipal carillonist in Gdańsk, and in 2011 she became the first foreign – and female – carillonist in Utrecht. Her repertoire comprises carillon adaptations of not only early, but also contemporary, and even pop, music. Since 2012 she has co-organised the Early Music Carillon Festival that is held within the framework of Festival Oude Muziek in Utrecht.
ADAM STRUG
ADAM
STRUG
ADAM
STRUG
Singer of traditional music; depositary and performer of the oral tradition of Polish music. Born in 1970 and brought up in north-eastern Mazovia, he digested a repertoire of devotional songs while growing up under the care of his grandmother who was the daughter of a village chanter and then took over his role in the local community. From childhood, he absorbed a manner of performed hymns that dated back to the period before World War I and most importantly involved solely the natural scales. At the age of 22 he returned to the countryside where he would sing with the local chanter Wincenty Nasiadko, doing, as he put it himself, ‘his apprenticeship under the guidance of a master’. Strug is currently active as a singer and song-writer; he is also the leader of the Monodia Polska ensemble and hosts numerous meetings during which, together with some volunteers, he performs a repertoire of traditional Polish songs. In addition, he records albums with both traditional, and his own, music, and also assists in contemporary renderings of historic repertoire.
MARCIN ŚWIĄTKIEWICZ
MARCIN
ŚWIĄTKIEWICZ
MARCIN
ŚWIĄTKIEWICZ
One of the most recognisable polish harpsichordists, Świątkiewicz plays various types of harpsichords and clavichords, as well as period pianos and organs. He is particularly passionate about improvisation. As a soloist, conductor, and chamber musician he collaborates regularly with the forefront of Polish and international orchestras and ensembles, including Brecon Baroque, Capella Cracoviensis, Arte dei Suonatori, {oh!} Orkiestra Historyczna, and AUKSO. In 2015, he recorded a solo album with Müthel’s late-Baroque harpsichord concertos, which was awarded the Diapason d’Or. Two years later he issued another solo recording entitled ‘Cromatica’, which won a series of awards. For the ‘Rosary Sonatas’ by Biber, recorded with Rachel Podger, David Miller, and Jonathan Manson, Świątkiewicz received the ‘Gramophone Award’. In 2016 he was also awarded the prestigious ‘Polityka’ weekly’s Passport Award. The latest achievements of the harpsichordist include the album with harpsichord concertos by J.S. Bach (2018) and the album with the ‘Goldberg Variations’ (2020). The artist is also a lecturer at the Karol Szymanowski Academy of Music in Katowice. He pays particular attention to the teaching of solo playing and to courses of partimento-based improvisation.
PROGRAMME
13.04godz. 17:30
PIEŚNI WIELKOPOSTNE
ADAM STRUG
Pieśni wielkopostne
Dokąd się mam uciekać nędzna gołębica
Wspominajmy Boże słowa, czyli siedem słów Chrystusa na krzyżu
Nie płynie potok rzewliwemi łzami
Jezu, z miłości na krzyżu rozpięty
Jużem dość pracował dla ciebie, człowiecze
Klęcząc w Ogrójcu
Już wychodzi Jezus z domu
Któż opłakać godnie może
Przystąpcie bliżej grzesznicy
Witaj, Matko uwielbiona
Już cię żegnam najmilszy
Dobranoc, Głowo święta

Adam Strug – voice
Hipolit Woźniak – hurdy-gurdy
Old Town Hall, ul. Korzenna 33/35
13.04godz. 20:00
MARC-ANTOINE CHARPENTIER: LEÇONS DE TÉNÈBRES
VINCENT DUMESTRE / LE POÈME HARMONIQUE
Marc-Antoine Charpentier
Prélude à quatre g-moll H 528
Symphonie à trois g-moll H 529
Unus ex discipulis meis H 132
Miserere mei, Deus H 226
 
Méditations pour le Carême
Tristis est anima mea H 382
Cum cenasset Jesus H 384
Quarebat Pilatus dimittere Jesum H 385
Tenebrae factae sunt H 386
Sola vivebat in antris H 388
 
Leçons de Ténèbres
Troisième leçon de ténèbres du Mercredi Saint H 135
Troisième leçon de ténèbres du Vendredi Saint H 137
 
Cyril Auvity – haute-contre
Nicholas Scott – tenore
Virgile Ancely – baritone
 
Le Poème Harmonique
Vincent Dumestre – dyrygent
St. John's Centrę, ul. Świętojańska 50
14.04godz. 17:30
JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH / CARL PHILIPP EMANUEL BACH: FLAUTENWERKE
AGNIESZKA GORAJSKA
Johann Sebastian Bach
Partita a-moll BWV 1013

Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach
Sonata a-moll Wq 132

Diego Ortiz
Recercada primera (Trattado de Glosas)

Agnieszka Gorajska – flute
Main Town Hall, ul. Długa 46
14.04godz. 20:00
TOMÁS LUIS DE VICTORIA: TENEBRAE RESPONSORIA
PETER PHILLIPS / THE TALLIS SCHOLARS
Tomás Luis de Victoria
Tenebrae Responsoria

Feria Quinta in Coena Domini ad Matutinum
Feria Sexta in Parasceve ad Matutinum
Sabbato Sancto ad Matutinum

The Tallis Scholars
Peter Phillips – conductor
Artus Court, ul. Długi Targ 43–44
15.04godz. 17:30
LAMENTATIONES FEMINÆ
AGNIESZKA BUDZIŃSKA-BENNETT
Lament klasztorny
Kyrie/Iesu parce ei (Pollença, XIV c.)
Plangit nonna fletibus (Italy, XI c.)
Awe meiner iungen tage (Germany, XIII c.)

Lament królewski
Omnis etas, omnis sexus (GallAnonim Chronicle, XII s.)

Lament chrześcijański
Crux de te volo conqueri (Paris, XIII c.)
O filii ecclesie/O liben kint der cristenheit (Innsbruck, XIV c.)

Lament pogański
Pieśń o Gudrun I (Iceland, XIII c.)

Agnieszka Budzińska-Bennett – voice, Roman harp
Main Town Hall, ul. Długa 46
15.04godz. 20:00
FRANÇOIS COUPERIN: LEÇONS DE TÉNÈBRES
WILLIAM CHRISTIE / LES ARTS FLORISSANTS
François Couperin
Leçons de Ténèbres pour le Mercredi Saint

Première leçon à une voix
Deuxième leçon à une voix
Troisième leçon à deux voix

Marc-Antoine Charpentier
Cinquième répons après la seconde leçon du second nocturne "Eram quais agnus" H 115
Septième répons après la première leçon du troisième nocturne "Seniores populi" H 117

Rachel Redmond – soprano
Gwendoline Blondeel – soprano

Les Arts Florissants
William Christie – conductor, organ, harpsichord
Myriam Rignol – viola da gamba
Artus Court, ul. Długi Targ 43–44
16.04godz. 17:30
JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH: ARIEN UND CHORÄLE
MAŁGORZATA FIEBIG
Johann Sebastian Bach
Concerto in d BWV 974 (arr. Arie Abbenes)

Mensch, bewein dein Sünde gross BWV 622 (arr. Bernard Winsemius)
Erbarm dich mein, o Herre Gott BWV 721 (arr. Bernard Winsemius)
Herzlich tut mich verlangen BWV 727 (arr. Bernard Winsemius)

Matthäus-Passion BWV 244
Buß und Reu (arr. Jaap van der Ende)
Blute nur, du liebes Herz (arr. Henry Groen)
Ich will dir mein Herze schenken (arr. Henry Groen)
Erbarme dich (arr. Henry Groen)
Aus Liebe will mein Heiland sterben (arr. Henry Groen)
Wir setzen uns mit Tränen nieder (arr. John Courter)

Małgorzata Fiebig – carillon
Main Town Hall, ul. Długa 46
16.04godz. 20:00
ORLANDO DI LASSO: HIEREMIAE PROPHETAE LAMENTATIONES
PAUL VAN NEVEL / HUELGAS ENSEMBLE
Orlando di Lasso
Hieremiae Prophetae Lamentationes

Feria Quinta in Coena Domini
Feria Sexta in Parasceve
Sabbato Sancto

Huelgas Ensemble
Paul Van Nevel – conductor
Artus Court, ul. Długi Targ 43–44
17.04godz. 17:30
GEORGE FRIDERIC HANDEL: SUITES DE PIÈCES POUR LE CLAVECIN HWV 426-429
MARCIN ŚWIĄTKIEWICZ
George Frideric Handel
Suites de Pièces pour le Clavecin HWV 426-429

Suite I A-dur HWV 426
Suite II F-dur HWV 427
Suite III d-moll HWV 428
Suite IV e-moll HWV 429

Marcin Świątkiewicz – harpsichord
Old Town Hall, ul. Korzenna 33/35
17.04godz. 20:00
JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH: ORCHESTERSUITEN BWV 1066–1069
AKADEMIE FÜR ALTE MUSIK BERLIN
Johann Sebastian Bach
Orchestersuiten BWV 1066–1069

Suite I C-dur BWV 1066
Suite II h-moll BWV 1067
Suite III D-dur BWV 1068
Suite IV D-dur BWV 1069

Akademie für Alte Musik Berlin
St. John's Centrę, ul. Świętojańska 50
VENUES
St. John’s Centre
St. John’s Centre
The first written mention of a small chapel dedicated to St. John comes from 1358. The church’s style is typical for late-Gothic architecture of the 14th and 15th centuries, with its heavy, buttressed structure, triple nave interior and flat-ended presbytery. The church took on its current form in the second half of the 15th century. In 1543, the church tower was destroyed by fire to be rebuilt 24 years later. In March 1945, the church burned down but its overall structure survived. After the war, the gutted building was roofed and its valuable vaults secured, but the church was designated a lapidarium. The Gdansk Diocese has been using it for services on Sundays and holidays since the 1990s. In 1995, the church was transferred to the management of the Baltic Sea Culture Centre (BSCC), which is reconstructing it with a view to converting it into a professional centre of culture.
Artus Court
Artus Court
In its day, Artus Court was home to the Brotherhood of St. George, providing a meeting place for nobles, merchants and courts. Currently, Artus Court is a branch of the Gdansk History Museum and is regarded as one of the city’s main tourist attractions. The history of Artus Court goes back to the middle of the 14th century - the building was erected in 1348–1350 and named after King Arthur, reflecting aspirations to the ideals of knightly virtue perfectly embodied by the legendary Celtic leader, and of equality and partnership symbolised by the Round Table at which Arthur sat with his knights. The building’s name, curia regis Artus (Royal Artus Court), was first mentioned in 1357. Artus Court is part of a route known as the Royal Way in the historic Main Town. Its interior is organised as one vast Gothic-style hall. In 1530, this seat of various brotherhoods, a meeting point and festival venue, took on another important role as a chamber for open court hearings. The Grand Hall’s acoustic properties were recognised in the late 17th century and regular concerts were held.
St. Catharine’s Church
St. Catharine’s Church
The Old Town’s oldest parish church. Founded by the Gdańsk Pomeranian Dukes it was dedicated to St. Catharine in 1236. The church is a hall-type edifice with pitched roof, a broad presbytery whose current three-nave structure was formed during a 15th century expansion, and a dominant tower. For nearly 400 years, it belonged to Protestants and was only transferred to the care of the Carmelite Order after the Second World War. In 2011, the world’s first pulsar clock was installed on the tower to celebrate the 400th birthday of Johann Hevelius, one of the city’s all-time greatest citizens. This is also where one finds the astronomer’s tombstone of 1659 and a piece of his coffin plaque with monogram J.H. and date of death 28 January 1687. In the 18th century, the church received its first carillon, subsequently modified and extended several times. The instrument survived a fire in 1905 and Nazi confiscation in 1942. Currently, the carillon consists of 50 bells spanning together four octaves making it Central Europe’s largest concert carillon.
Main Town Hall
Main Town Hall
The Great Wety Hall (the White Hall) is located in the eastern wing of the first and most elegant storey of the building. When the Polish kings visited Gdansk, the hall served as a throne room and a place where the royal burgrave received oaths and issued court judgments. The Great Wety Hall hosted commemorations of Polish citizenship and, until the middle of the 16th century, was the venue of City Council meetings. Starting from 1526, the Hall was used for sittings of the common folk chamber (the Third Ordynek) and the Wety Court. Between 1817 and 1921, the Great Wety Hall was mostly referred to as the City Council Hall (Stadtverordnetensaal) as it hosted the meetings of City Representatives. In 1840-1841, its interiors were rebuilt in a neo-gothic style based on the summer refectory from the Grand Master’s Palace in Malbork Castle. In 1909, a 16th century Renaissance portal, that was originally located in the merchant’s house at Chlebnicka 11, was placed over the entry to the Main Hallway. In 1945, the destroyed hall was reconstructed following the design Stanisław Bobiński and brought back to its pre-1941 condition.
Old Market Town Hall
Old Market Town Hall
Created by Anthonis van Obberghen, the Old Market Town Hall was erected in late 16th century in the Dutch Mannerist style. Built for the Old Town authorities, the building was a centre of the political, economic, scientific and social life of this part of Gdansk for many centuries. It was there that city debates were held, that the Grand Hall hosted official ceremonies, while balls and parties were organised there in the evenings. A famous Gdansk-based scholar and astronomer Johannes Hevelius resided in the Old Market Town Hall as an assessor and the first councillor, storing his home-made beer in the town hall cellars. With its landmark silhouette, the town hall is a major urban highlight of the Old Town. Regardless of many reconstructions, the town hall envelope has remained unchanged until now. Multiple modifications of its interior have enriched the building with exceptional objects. The first floor features an elegant hallway and an imposing Grand Hall, now known as the Bourgeoisie Hall, with an original wooden ceiling.
MAP

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